Attacks on Freedom »

By John Stossel

Something’s happened to America, and it isn’t good. It’s become easier to get into trouble. We’ve become a nation of a million rules. Not the kind of bottom-up rules that people generate through voluntary associations. Those are fine. I mean imposed, top-down rules formed in the brains of meddling bureaucrats who think they know better than we how to manage our lives.

Cross them, and we are …

Judges, the Constitution & Gun Control Laws »

By Thomas Sowell

Now that the Supreme Court of the United States has decided that the Second Amendment to the Constitution means that individual Americans have a right to bear arms, what can we expect?

Those who have no confidence in ordinary Americans may expect a bloodbath, as the benighted masses start shooting each other, now that they can no longer be denied guns by their betters. People who think …

In Washington, 'Disclose' Means Stifle »

By Debra Saunders

Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives passed HR5175, also known as the Disclose Act, by a 219-206 vote. “Disclose,” you see, is an acronym for “Democracy Is Strengthened by Casting Light on Spending in Elections.”

The measure’s author, Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., also happens to chair the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee — so you know that the bill has nothing to do with helping Democrats …

Americans Relate to Founders, Not Progressives »

By Michael Barone

Democrats are reportedly planning to raise $125 million for a campaign to sell Obamacare to the voting public. Apparently, the idea is that what 50-plus presidential speeches and statements and months of congressional debate could not do can be done by $125 million spent on everything from TV ads to community organizers.

Maybe. But there seems to be a more fundamental problem here. The Obama Democrats didn’t …

You're losing your plan: ObamaCare's true face emerges »

By SCOTT GOTTLIEB

Late last week saw the first leaks of the administration’s draft regulations for implementing the ObamaCare law — and everything is playing out just as the critics warned.

The 3,000-odd pages of legislation left most of the really important (and controversial) policy decisions to the regulations that government agencies were told to issue once the bill passed. Now that those regs are starting to take shape, it’s …

Which America will it be after 2010? »

BY J.C. WATTS

Let’s take stock of where the United States is going.

The nation has a $1.4 trillion deficit and is $13 trillion in debt. Retirement security for millions of Americans is in jeopardy. The new health care law slashes Medicare by $500 billion over 10 years, destroys the traditional doctor-patient relationship and imposes new taxes. Continuing illegal immigration takes jobs from unemployed Americans, and the illegals take from …

U.S. Embraces Model That's Failed Europe »

The newspaper headlines say it all. On the one hand, “Crisis Imperils Liberal Benefits Long Expected by Europeans,” while in this country: “Private Pay Plummets, Government Handouts Soar.”

The modern European welfare state has proven unsustainable. From Greece to Britain, from France to Portugal, European countries are slashing social welfare benefits, raising the retirement age and dismantling government bureaucracies. Yet, even as Europe is learning that you can’t forever rob …

Free to Choose »

by John Stossel

America’s current struggles notwithstanding, life here is pretty good. We have a standard of living that’s the envy of most of the world.

Why did that happen? Prosperity isn’t the norm. Throughout history and throughout the world, poverty has been the norm. Most of the world still lives in dire poverty. Of the 6 billion people on earth, perhaps 1 billion have something close to our standard …

Need it tomorrow? »

By Jerry Stanton

Whether it’s hard-to-find replacement parts, legal documents, merchandise or a child’s favorite toy, next-day delivery is a service we Americans have grown to depend on.  Overnight or second-day delivery saves time, money and personal frustration, and strong competition in the express-delivery industry has created an amazingly reliable system.

The aggressive competition in the air express industry keeps shipping charges reasonable and stimulates better service.  With markets expanding …

The limits of the welfare state »

By George F. Will

Today, as it has been for a century, American politics is an argument between two Princetonians — James Madison, class of 1771, and Woodrow Wilson, class of 1879. Madison was the most profound thinker among the Founders. Wilson, avatar of “progressivism,” was the first President critical of the nation’s founding. Barack Obama’s Wilsonian agenda reflects its namesake’s rejection of limited government.

Lack of “a limiting principle” …

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